How will 3D printing change the future of the job market in Australia?

3d printing and jobs3D printers can churn out toys, clothing and even food. But the technology also shows potential for use in industrial sabotage, researchers warn.

Imagine a car maker using 3D printers to manufacture components, only to have the parts contain defects that are undetectable until it’s too late.

A hacker with access to the 3D printers could make that happen, a team of researchers wrote in a recent paper. This could result in a “devastating impact” for users and lead to product recalls and lawsuits, said New York University professor Nikhil Gupta, the lead author of the paper.

3D printing is also known as “additive manufacturing.” It involves printing out layer after layer of material to create an object, like a plastic figurine or even a house.

The technology could streamline manufacturing, and the car industry is already experimenting with it. In the past, companies used 3D printers mainly to create prototypes, but recent advancements will expand the use of the technology to make actual products, research firm Gartner predicts.

If that happens, companies should be on guard for possible misuse. Many 3D printers are connected to the Internet, allowing for remote control, the researchers said. Hackers might be able to target these printers and secretly introduce internal defects in the manufacturing process. To read more click here.

What will 3D printing do to the job market in Australia? As machines replace people the future of the job market is every changing. What can we expect the job market to look like in 5, 10 or 20 years time?

The 2016 Australian Long-Term Unemployment Conference; Finding Solutions will be held on the 1-2 December 2016, at the Mercure in Brisbane. To register for the Conference CLICK HERE. Early bird closes 20th October.

The conference theme focuses on industry working together with employment agencies to create positive outcomes for Australia’s long-term unemployed.

Authors or organisations interested in presenting at the 2016 Australian Long-Term Unemployment Conference are invited to submit a 300 word abstract. To submit an abstract CLICK HERE. Abstracts close 11th August.

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